APBA Pro Football Replays

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I’ve used the APBA Football Master game to replay several seasons.  The Master game provides the “ebb and flow” of an actual contest and allows the “coach” the opportunity to deploy multiple personnel packages to mirror today’s game or the single platoon system of yesteryear. On numerous occasions, I’ve matched team records and have come extremely close to replicating team and individual statistics.

My purpose for creating this blog is to present my current and previous replays, offer “method of play” alternatives, share innovations, provide tools for evaluating individual cards, post links and informational tips to assist with preparing for and conducting season replays.     

For any APBA Football related questions, feel free to contact me at Oguard62@yahoo.com.       

 APBA Football Cover

Playoff Format used during the 1985 Season

The two wildcard teams (the two best non-division winners, regardless of division affiliation) will meet in the wildcard round. The winner will advance to the divisional round, to face the highest seeded team that was not a member of its same division. (Division opponents can only meet in the championship game). The third-best (lowest seeded) division winner played at the remaining division winner in the other semifinal. The league determined playoff seeding based on record among divisional winners, with the best record getting home field advantage throughout the playoffs.

To break a tie within a division

 1. Head-to-head (best won-lost-tied percentage in games between the clubs).
 2. Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the division.
 3. Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the conference.
 4. Best won-lost-tied percentage in common games, if applicable.
 5. Best net points in division games.
 6. Best net points in all games.
 7. Strength of schedule.
 8. Best net touchdowns in all games.
 9. Coin toss.
 
 To break a tie for the wild-card team

If the tied clubs are from the same division, apply division tiebreaker.

If the tied clubs are from different divisions, apply the following steps:

Two teams
 1. Head-to-head, if applicable.
 2. Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the conference.
 3. Best won-lost-tied percentage in common games, minimum of four.
 4. Best average net points in conference games.
 5. Best net points in all games.
 6. Strength of schedule.
 7. Best net touchdowns in all games.
 8. Coin toss.
 Three or more teams
 (Note: If two clubs remain tied after third or other clubs are eliminated, tiebreaker reverts to step 1 of applicable two-club format).
 1. Apply division tiebreaker to eliminate all but the highest-ranked club in each division prior to proceeding to step 2. The original seeding within a division upon application of the division tiebreaker remains the same for all subsequent applications of the procedure that are necessary to identify the three wild-card participants.
 2. Head-to-head sweep. (Applicable only if one club has defeated each of the others or if one club has lost to each of the others).
 3. Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the conference.
 4. Best won-lost-tied percentage in common games, minimum of four.
 5. Best average net points in conference games.
 6. Best net points in all games.
 7. Strength of schedule.
 8. Best net touchdowns in all games.
 9. Coin toss.

Exhibition Game, My Foot!!

At the conclusion of my 1985 NFL replay, I will replay the 1969 AFL and NFL seasons with an “exclusive set” created by my best friend – Mark Zarb. I couldn’t think of a better way to begin this project than by replaying the most important exhibition game in professional football history, the New York Jets versus the New York Giants.

In 1969, the teams were fighting for attention and allegiances. The preseason game was seen as a turf war, which the Giants were afraid they were losing.

Months earlier, the American Football League’s Jets had upset the Baltimore Colts to win the third Super Bowl, creating instant credibility for a league that the N.F.L. long tried to ignore. No team represented the staid N.F.L. better than the Giants, a stable-but-mediocre flagship franchise. No team represented the surging A.F.L. like the Jets, with Broadway Joe Namath at quarterback.

“It was emblematic of an old, tired Model T against a Corvette,” Fred Dryer, a rookie defensive end on the 1969 Giants said.

George Vecsey of The New York Times summed up the perception of the Jets among the uneasy Giants and their fans in an article that ran before the game. “Right now, they are the champions of the world,” he wrote. “Does that make them the champions of New York?”

The Jets viewed the game with the Giants as a possible exclamation point to their Super Bowl victory, a way to extinguish lingering doubters close to home.

“People still thought over all the N.F.L. was better — better players, more established teams, stronger management,” kicker Pete Gogolak, who joined the Giants in 1966 after playing for the A.F.L.’s Buffalo Bills said during an interview. “It really wasn’t the case.”

The Giants viewed the game nervously. They had not made the playoffs the previous five seasons. They had little to gain and little chance of winning against the Jets, and were constantly reminded of that by fans and reporters leading up to the game, played in front of 70,874 fans at the Yale Bowl in New Haven.

“I remember the look on Allie Sherman’s face before the game,” Dryer said, referring to the Giants’ coach, who was entering his ninth season. “And everyone’s face. It was a look of fear, because people did a good job of putting the pressure on the inferior team.”

The Jets went on to win, 37-14. Giants fans serenaded Sherman with what had become a familiar refrain: “Goodbye, Allie,” sung to the tune of “Good Night, Ladies.”

Sherman was fired a few weeks later, at the end of a 0-5 preseason. Losing badly to the Jets seemed a tipping point.

I will do a follow-up post to see how the game played out on my tabletop.